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After terrible tornado, good people and tough times still remain

After terrible tornado, good people and tough times still remain


After terrible tornado, good people and tough times still remain

Three months have passed since a massive tornado ripped through West Kentucky, and claimed the lives of 22 people in the town of Mayfield, and a pastor says hope is what the recovering community needs most.

The Dec. 10 tornado that left a 165-mile path behind it was classified an EF-4 due to the damage it left behind in eleven counties. All together, it killed 56 people in several states.

The world’s attention and the TV news crews have since moved on but Kentucky church pastor Joel Cauley says free meals are still being provided to 1,000 people daily who are spread over five counties in the region.

“Faith based nonprofits are definitely still showing up and showing out,” he tells American Family News, “and they're in it for the long-haul.”

The pastor, who leads Relevant Church in nearby Paducah, says the groups on the ground include Samaritan's Purse, 8 Days of Hope, Mercy Chefs, Hand of Hope, and God's Pit Crew.

All of them are providing an important service, he says, which is providing hope in the midst of devastation and loss.

“It is just giving people a sense of hope, because right now they walk out the door and they're not on their property or their properties landscape has forever changed,” he says. “And so it's a constant view of the chaos.”

Debris is still being cleared away, and the “red tape” of home insurance, and help from FEMA and the Red Cross, are just in the beginning stages, too, the pastor advises.