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Abortion supporters don't approve of message 'every baby is precious'

Abortion supporters don't approve of message 'every baby is precious'


A new law in Arizona that bans abortions based on genetic conditions, such as Down syndrome, is being challenged in court by a group of abortion supporters.

Abortion supporters don't approve of message 'every baby is precious'

A lawsuit filed in Arizona by abortion supporters is challenging a ban on Down syndrome abortions, an issue that is not going away anytime soon thanks to other state legislatures that are addressing it.

State legislatures in Ohio and Tennessee have passed similar laws, inevitably leading to lawsuits, but a federal appeals court has ruled those laws can remain in effect at least for now.

"Every baby is a precious human being that deserves to be protected," Carol Tobias, who leads National Right to Life, says. "People with Down syndrome can have great lives, and they are participating in various activities in their communities, including sports."

Tobias, Carol (NRLC) Tobias

The new Arizona law, which allows for felony charges against doctors, was passed by the GOP-controlled legislature and signed by Gov. Doug Ducey in April, The Associated Press reported.

A similar law was passed by North Carolina’s legislature, too, but vetoed by Gov. Roy Cooper, the AP said.

Montana's pro-life laws invite Planned Parenthood lawsuit

Planned Parenthood is suing to stop pro-life laws in Montana, which are set to take effect in October, and a pro-life leader says it is telling to witness the abortion provider defend any and all abortions.

Among other abortion-tightening requirements, the new law bans most abortions after 20 weeks and requires health care providers offer women an ultrasound before the abortion.

"We're talking really mainstream, common sense pieces of legislation," says Kristi Hamrick of Students for Life. "Planned Parenthood is telling the citizens of Montana they cannot have pro-life laws of any kind, and they're going to court to make these laws stop because there is no abortion they won't support."

Montana’s attorney general Austin Knudsen, who is named as a defendant in the lawsuit, has said Montana’s voters reject Planned Parenthood’s “extreme pro-abortion positions.”

Montana’s new pro-life measures were signed into law earlier this year by Gov. Greg Gianforte, the state’s new Republican governor.

Regarding state legislatures tackling the issue, Tobias says it is likely much of the public is unaware unborn children are being terminated when it’s learned they have a disability or a genetic abnormality.

"I think that's a sad state of affairs for our country,” she observes, “and I'm glad that states are trying to protect those babies and also just raise public awareness that it's happening."

The lawsuit was filed by the Center for Reproductive Rights; the American Civil Liberties Union; the National Council of Jewish Women; National Organization for Women; and the Arizona Medical Association, the AP reported.